Finding Home through painting in the Arab world

The mission of art is to enrich human heritage with creative insights. This can contribute in however a small way be of great significance in building the future. Art can add to new perceptions of human heritage.
Since World War One the Middle East region has been facing continuous wars leading to a demographic change in Iraq, Syria, Lebanon, and the Palestine territories. This is why artists living in these countries have depicted the agony of these events in an abstract way. Many Muslims believe that the depiction of living forms is forbidden in the Quran.  Abstract images of a village or hometown presented in many of the paintings, create an unconscious nostalgia for the audience.

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Lebanese artist and architect Zeina Alami was born in 1973. She makes whimsical, Mediterranean, figurative, urban art juxtaposing this with the abstraction in her paintings.

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One of the most prominent contemporary Lebanese artists is Ayman Baalbaki born in 1975 in Odeissé. His work covers war-related themes, portraits of fighters or scattered structures as a result of the bombings of Beirut.

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The Artist Ghassan Muhsin was born in 1945. He works as an Iraqi diplomat. He shows nostalgia with beautiful color combinations. The richness of nature in the countries he lived is clearly conveyed by the land- , cityscapes and gardens he paints.

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Louay Kayali was born in 1943 in Aleppo. His work focuses on the political struggle in the Arab countries. The national resistance movements and, in particular, the struggle of the Palestinian people for freedom and independence.

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Khaled Hafez was born in Cairo, Egypt in 1963. He as well as art, he also studied medicine. His work focuses on the various complexions of Egyptian history.  His work was selected for the Venice Biennale in 2015.

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